The Texas Hemp Industries Association is a state chapter of the Hemp Industries Association (HIA), a nonprofit trade organization established to represent and educate politicians, farmers, businesses and consumers on the economic and ecological benefits of industrial hemp.

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TXHIA Executive Director, Sheila Hemphill, testifies before the Department of State Health Services at the  October 3, Hearing on HB 1325.

The USDA released their interim rules for hemp cultivation and the Hemp Industries Association (HIA) and the TXHIA are preparing comments for submission by the December 30th deadline.

 

Many thanks to our Heritage Sponsors and Legacy Supporters and the valuable contributions from the individuals who helped to 

Bring Hemp Home To Texas!

Act now to be listed as a 2019 legacy supporter with your donation to kick start the hemp industry in Texas.
 

As the 46th state to enact the hemp legislation, we look forward to working with the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) and Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) to enable the Texas hemp industry to be the most successful in the nation.

WE NEED COUNTY COORDINATORS.
RESPONSIBILITIES REQUIRED
.

Learn more.

 

County Coordinators Needed!

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ATTENTION!

 

To plant and grow hemp in Texas without a
Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) license is ILLEGAL! 
Seed sources will need to be approved by TDA to show chain of custody from seed to sale once rules are established by TDA and approved by USDA.  It is estimated that licenses will not be available until 2020.

Hemp for food, feed, fiber, and building materials ... and many more uses!
Industrial hemp is that hemp milk you put in coffee or the hemp protein at the smoothie shop.  Perhaps it's the oil in your shampoo, lotion or cosmetics.  Hemp was an foundational commodity in the formation of our country.  In 2016, the United States imported $688 million in hemp products primarily from Canada.  This dollar amount does not include the large retailers of Costco, Whole Foods, Wal-Mart etc.  For over 20 years, we have been able to wear hemp, eat it, make things from it but our farmers have been prohibited from growing it because of it being a cousin to marijuana.  
Industrial hemp is from the plant species Cannabis sativa L. in the plant genus Cannabis.  The over 200 molecules found in the plant are known as cannabinoids.  The cannabinoid Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) can create an intoxicating effect if concentration levels are high enough.  Another molecule, Cannabidiol (CBD) is the cannabinoid reported to be anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, anti-seizure, and anti-spasmodic.  The gene predisposition of the seed will determine if the plant is high in THC, marijuana, or low in THC hemp.  Similar to poppy seeds on muffins versus poppy seeds for opiate drugs, in this analogy, hemp would be in the muffin category so people do not get high on hemp.
 
Quick Facts about Hemp:
-          Serves as a rotation crop for farmers and there are 46 states that have laws in place to allow for its cultivation but not in Texas.
-          Takes less than 1/2 the amount of water as cotton requiring little to no herbicides or pesticides.
-           Fibers are longer and stronger than other natural fibers making it an ideal substitute for fiberglass since it is stronger and lighter.
-          Hemp can be grown in areas that grow cotton, corn or wheat and other crops.
-           Products include uses as food, feed, seed oil, fiber, fuel, personal care items, lotions, cosmetics, shampoos, CBD rich nutritional hemp exact oils, building materials for the housing, auto, aerospace etc.
-          Letters of intent to conduct research have been received from Texas Tech University, Plant and Soil Department for fiber and water conservation, the University of North Texas Mechanical and Energy Engineering Department for the building and automotive industry, and the University of Houston for many uses through their Innovation Center.
-          Letters of intent to purchase have been received from Patagonia, for fiber, Whole Foods for Texas grown hemp,  Fresh Hemp Foods, one of the largest producer of Canadian hemp has producer contracts waiting to purchase, “all the organic grown hemp Texas can produce.”  One acre of hemp can produce 800-1200 lbs of seed which retails for $9.00-18.99 per lb. 
-         Click here for Farmer's Guide
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2018 Farm Bill Listening Session
San Angelo, TX  7/31/17
The Texas Hemp Industries Association is teaming up with Austin's Community First to build a tiny hemp home for the homeless.
Help us fund this project!